Top Ten Emergency Service Calls


With today’s complex standby power systems, it is important that you understand the basic settings of your system, the method and procedures involved in proper regular maintenance, and the protocol to deal with alarm conditions in the case of system failure. This information will keep you from wasting valuable business time over generator failure due to inaccurate settings or neglected maintenance.

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"Averting Common Causes of Generator Failure: Understanding How to Properly Maintain Your Standby Power System."

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1. Battery Failure:

The single most frequent service call for generator failure is battery failure. Read more...

2. Low Coolant Level Alarms/Shutdown:

The most obvious cause for a low coolant level is either an external or internal leak. Read more...

3. Low Coolant Temp Alarms:

Block heaters run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and periodically, they are going to fail. Read more...

4. Leaks – Oil, Fuel, or Coolant:

Leaks can be prevented by routine maintenance planning. Read more...

5. Controls not in Auto:

Ninety-nine percent of service calls received for generator controls "not in auto" are the direct result of human error. Read more...

6. Fuel Bled Back into the Tank/Generator Will not Start:

This is a common problem with newer generators that are not run on a regular basis. Read more...

7. Engine Ran Out of Fuel:

Mechanical fuel level gauges may not always be accurate. Read more...

8. High Fuel Level Alarm:

High Fuel Level alarms are required by government regulations to prevent the overfilling of a fuel tank. Read more...

9. Breaker Trip not Related to the Generator:

This service call will usually come in as "We are in a power outage and the generator doesn't start." Read more...

10. "My Generator is Running!"

After a local power outage, many service calls come in stating that "utility power is back on and the generator is running." Read more...